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Authors - S

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Oliver Sacks

Carl Sagan

Nick Sagan

Angela Saini

Colin Salter

Ian Sample

Nina Samuels

Lisa Sanders

Brandon Sanderson

Arturo Sangalli

Aaron Santos

Lucy Jane Santos

Robert Sapolsky

Helmut Satz

Eric Scerri

Caleb Scharf

Edward Scheinermann

Govert Schilling

Govert Schilling (with Marcus Chown)

Dirk Schulze-Makuch (with David Darling)

Linda Schweizer

Bruce Schumm

Massive Science 

  • Women of Science Tarot **
  • Mosaic Science (Wellcome)

    Robert Scoble (with Irena Cronin)

    Deborah Scott (with Simon Malpas) Eds.

    David Scott

    Bobby Seagull

    Gino Segre

    Charles Seife

    Marc Seifer

    Michael Sells

    Howard Selina (with Henry Brighton)

    Howard Selina (with Dylan Evans)

    Asya Semenovich

    • Fire of the Dark Triad (SF) ***

    Paul Sen

    Meera Senthilingam

    Anil Seth

    Edar Shafir (with Sendhil Mullainathan)

    Mike Shanahan

    Karen Shanor (with Jagmeet Kanwal)

    Dennis Shasha (with Cathy Lazere)

    Peter Shaver

    Bob Shaw

    Shashi Shekhar (with Pamela Vold)

    William Sheehan

    Rupert Sheldrake

    Mary Shelley

    David Shenk

    Michael Shermer

    Michael Shermer (with Arthur Benjamin)

    Margot Lee Shetterly

    Neil Shubin

    Seth Shulman

    Joel Shurkin

    Nate Silver

    Clifford Simak

    Dean Keith Simonton

    Simon Singh

    Simon Singh (with Edzard Ernst)

    Fredrik Sjöberg

    Keith Skene

    Brian Skyrms (with Persi Diaconis)

    Charlotte Sleigh (with Amanda Rees)

    Andrew Smart

    Chris Smith

    Gary Smith

    Gavin Smith

    Ginny Smith

    Laurence Smith

    Leonard Smith

    P. D. Smith

    Lee Smolin

    Raymond Smullyan

    Alan Sokal

    Robert Solomon

    Jimmy Soni (with Rob Goodman)

    Giles Sparrow

    Vassilios McInnes Spathopoulos

    David Spiegelhalter

    Francis Spufford

    Ashwin Srinivasan

    Clifford Spiro

    Curt Stager

    Russell Stannard

    Douglas Star

    Michael Starbird (with Edward Burger)

    Natalie Starkey

    Robert Stayton

    Andrew Steane

    Michael Stebbins

    James Stein

    Paul Steinhardt (with Neil Turok)

    Neal Stephenson

    Simon Stephenson

    Martin Stevens

    Iain Stewart

    Ian Stewart

    Ian Stewart (with Terry Pratchett and Jack Cohen)

    Jeff Stewart

    David Stipp

    Douglas Stone

    James Stone

    Mary Stopes-Roe

    David Stork

    Carole Stott (with Robin Kerrod) 

    Paul Strathearn

    Linda Stratmann

    Michael Strauss (with Neil de Grasse Tyson and Richard Gott)

    Steven Strogatz

    Rick Stroud

    Students of the Camden School for Girls

    Colin Stuart

    Colin Stuart (with Mun Keat Looi)

    Daniel Styler

  • Relativity for the Questioning Mind ****
  • Samanth Subramanian

    Robert Sullivan

    David Sumpter

    Gaurav Suri (with Hartosh Singh Bal)

    Jamie Susskind

    Leonard Susskind (with Art Friedman)

    Richard and Daniel Susskind

    Henrik Svensmark (with Nigel Calder)

    Brian Switek

    Bryan Sykes

    Jeremy Szal

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