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John Kadvany (with Baruch Fischhoff)

David Kaiser

James Kakalios

Michio Kaku

Liz Kalaugher (with Matin Durrani)

Kostas Kampourakis (with Kevin McCain)


Nick Kanas

Eric Kandel

Jagmeet Kanwal (with Karen Shanor)

Ruth Kassinger

Wallace Kaufman (with David Deamer)

Sam Kean

Jonathon Keats

Melanie Keene

John Kelleher

  • Deep Learning (MIT Press Essential Knowledge) **
  • Laurent Keller (with Elisabeth Gordon)

    Ilan Kelman

  • Disaster by Choice: how our actions turn natural hazards into catastrophes ***
  • Dacher Keltner

    Dacher Keltner (with Jason Marsh and Jeremy Adam)

    Daniel Kennefick

    Brian Kernighan

    Robin Kerrod (with Carole Stott)

    Apoorva Khare (with Anna Lachowska)

    Kate Kirk

    Kate Kirk (with Charles Cotton)

    Irving Kirsch

  • The Emperor's New Drugs: exploding the anti-depressant myth ****
  • Konrad Kleinknecht

    Cyril Kornbluth (with Frederik Pohl)

    Helge Kragh

    Lawrence Krauss

  • Quantum Man: Richard Feynman's Life in Physics ****
  • Nina Kraus

  • Of Sound Mind: how our brain constructs a meaningful sonic world ***
  • Jeffrey Kripal

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