Skip to main content

Authors - K

A-B-C-D-E-F-G-H-I-J-K-L-M-N-O-P-Q-R-S-T-U-V-W-X-Y-Z


John Kadvany (with Baruch Fischhoff)

David Kaiser

James Kakalios

Michio Kaku

Liz Kalaugher (with Matin Durrani)

Kostas Kampourakis (with Kevin McCain)


Nick Kanas

Eric Kandel

Jagmeet Kanwal (with Karen Shanor)

Ruth Kassinger

Wallace Kaufman (with David Deamer)

Sam Kean

Jonathon Keats

Melanie Keene

John Kelleher

  • Deep Learning (MIT Press Essential Knowledge) **
  • Laurent Keller (with Elisabeth Gordon)

    Ilan Kelman

  • Disaster by Choice: how our actions turn natural hazards into catastrophes ***
  • Dacher Keltner

    Dacher Keltner (with Jason Marsh and Jeremy Adam)

    Daniel Kennefick

    Brian Kernighan

    Robin Kerrod (with Carole Stott)

    Apoorva Khare (with Anna Lachowska)

    Will Kinney

    Kate Kirk

    Kate Kirk (with Charles Cotton)

    Irving Kirsch

  • The Emperor's New Drugs: exploding the anti-depressant myth ****
  • Konrad Kleinknecht

    Cyril Kornbluth (with Frederik Pohl)

    Helge Kragh

    Lawrence Krauss

  • Quantum Man: Richard Feynman's Life in Physics ****
  • Nina Kraus

  • Of Sound Mind: how our brain constructs a meaningful sonic world ***
  • Jeffrey Kripal

    Comments

    Popular posts from this blog

    The Book of Minds - Philip Ball ****

    It's fitting that this book on the nature of minds should be written by the most cerebral of the UK's professional science writers, Philip Ball. Like the uncertainty attached to the related concept of consciousness, exactly what a mind is , and what makes it a mind, is very difficult to pin down. Ball takes us effectively through some of the difficult definitions and unpacking involved to understand at least what researchers mean by 'mind', even if their work doesn't not necessarily enlighten us much. A lot of the book is taken up with animals and to what extent they can be said to have minds. Ball bases his picture of a mind on a phrase that is reminiscent of Nagel's famous paper on being a bat. According to Ball, an organism can be said to have a mind if there is something that is what it is like to be that organism. (You may need to read that a couple of times.) At one end of the spectrum - apes, cetaceans, dogs, for instance - it's hard to believe that t

    Forget Me Not - Sophie Pavelle ***(*)

    There was a lot to like in Sophie Pavelle's debut popular science title. In it, she visits ten locations in the UK (against the backdrop of the Covid lockdowns) where species that are in some way threatened by humans and/or climate change are found. The writing style is extremely light and personal, while the content on the different species was both interesting and informative. I particularly enjoyed chapters on sea grass and dung beetles, which are accompanied by coverage of a species each of butterfly, porpoise, bat, guillemot, salmon, hare, bird of prey and bumblebee. There's a nice mix of three threads - writing about the species itself, about the visit to the location (so something close to travel writing, as Pavelle attempts to avoid driving and flying as much as possible) and about the environmental side. I'm not sure the writing style is for everyone - I found it verged on arch at times, didn't endear me with several enthusiastic references to Love Island and

    The Midwich Cuckoos (SF) - John Wyndham *****

    The recent TV adaptation of John Wyndham's classic science fiction novel inspired me to dig out my copy (which has a much better cover than the current Penguin version) to read it again for the first time in decades - and it was a treat. Published in 1957, the book takes a cosy world that feels more typical of a 1930s novel - think, for example, of a village in Margery Allingham's or Agatha Christie's books - and applies to it a wonderfully innovative SF concept. Rather than give us the classic H. G. Wells alien invasion, which, as a character points out, is really just conventional warfare with a twist, Wyndham envisaged a far more insidious invasion where the aliens are implanted in every woman of childbearing age in the village (in a period of time known as the Dayout, when everyone is rendered unconscious).  Apparently like humans but for their bright golden eyes, a joined consciousness and the ability to influence human minds, the Children effectively take over the vil