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Authors - L

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Anna Lachowska (with Apoorva Khare)

R. A. Lafferty

Alex Lamb

Nick Lane

Philippa Lang

Charles Langmuir (with Wally Broecker)

Mark Lasbury

Robert Laughlin

J. L. Lawrence

Eric Lax

Cathy Lazere (with Dennis Shasha)

James Le Fanu

Ursula Le Guin

Hervé Le Tellier (Trans. Adriana Hunter)

Tom Lean

Leon Lederman (with Christopher Hill)

Leon Lederman (with Dick Teresi)

Jonah Lehrer

Fritz Leiber

Stanislaw Lem

Michael Lemonick

Armand Leroi

Nigel Lesmoir-Gordon (with Will Rood and Ralph Edney)

Richard Lester

Hector Levesque

Mark Levi

Frank Levin

Janna Levin

Yasha Levine

Steven Levitt (with Stephen Dubner)

Tim Lewens

Mark Leyner (with Billy Goldberg)

Gideon Lichfield (Ed.)

Thomas Lin

David Linden

Grace Lindsay

Martin Lindstrom

Chris Lintott

Chris Lintott (with Patrick Moore, Brian May)

Lewis Little

David Livingston

Mario Livio

Charles Lockwood

William Bryant Logan

Mun Keat Looi (with Colin Stuart)

Jonathan Losos

Rosaly Lopes (with Michael Carroll)

David Love

Catherine Loveday

James Lovelock

Pete Lunn

Mark Lynas

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