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Authors - C

A-B-C-D-E-F-G-H-I-J-K-L-M-N-O-P-Q-R-S-T-U-V-W-X-Y-Z

Tom Cabot

John Cacioppo (with William Patrick)

Deborah Cadbury

Alice Calaprice

Nigel Calder

Nigel Calder (with Henrik Svensmark)

Jo Callaghan

Paul Callaghan (with Kim Hill)

Paul Callaghan (with Bill Manhire)

Craig Callender (with Ralph Edney)

Deborah Cameron

Miles Cameron

Fritjof Capra

Louise Carey

Nessa Carey

Robert Cargill

Bernard Carlson 

Brian Carpenter

Michael Carroll

Sean Carroll

Richard Carter

Rita Carter

Stephen Cass (with Kevin Grazier)

Tom Cassidy (with Thomas Byrne)

Brian Cathcart

Tom Chaffin

Jack Challoner

Jack Challoner (with John Perry)

Jack Chalmers

Kit Chapman

Nicholas Cheetham

Margaret Cheney

Eugenia Cheng

Tom Chivers

Tom Chivers and David Chivers

Alan Chodos (with James Riordan)

Marcus Chown

Marcus Chown (with Govert Schilling)

Brian Christian

Brian Christian (with Tom Griffiths)

Robert Cialdini (with Noah Goldstein & Steve Martin)

Milan Circovic

John Clancy

Stuart Clark

Arthur C. Clarke

David Clarke

David Clary

Brian Clegg 

Brian Clegg (with Oliver Pugh)

Brian Clegg (with Rhodri Evans)

Raymond Clemens (ed.)

Daniel Clery

Harry Cliff

Frank Close

Matthew Cobb

I. B. Cohen

Jack Cohen (with Ian Stewart and Terry Pratchett)

Richard Cohen

Leonard Cole

Peter Coles

Harry Collins

Robert Colvile

Neil Comins

Arthur Conan Doyle

Joseph Conlon

Mariana Cook

Matt Cook

Peter Cook

Mike Cook (with Tony Veale)

Nancy Cooke (with Margaret Hilton) Eds.

Ashley Cooper

Geoffrey Cooper

Henry Cooper

Jennifer Coopersmith

Jack Copeland

David Corcoran (Ed.)

Paul Cornell

Charles Cotton (with Kate Kirk)

Heather Couper (with Nigel Henbest)

  • The Story of Astronomy *****
  • Robin Cousin

    Brian Cox (with Jeff Forshaw)

    Daniel Coyle

    Jerry Coyne

    Naomi Craft

    Catherine Craig (with Leslie Brunetta)

    Robert Crease

    Robert Crease (with Alfred Scarf Goldhaber)

    Ian Crofton

    Irena Cronin (with Robert Scoble)

    Alfred Crosby

    John Croucher (with Rosalind Croucher)

    Rosalind Croucher (with John Croucher)

    Vilmos Csányi

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