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Authors - D

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Thibault Damour (with Mathieu Burniat)

Erich von Daniken

David Darling

David Darling (with Dirk Schulze-Makuch)

Charles Darwin

Paul Dauvergne

Paul Davies

Sally Davies

Daniel Davis

Richard Dawkins

Mark Stuart Day

Niall Deacon

David Deamer (with Wallace Kaufman)

Kees van Deemter

Ronald Deibert

Louis Del Monte

Mark Denny

John Derbyshire

Adrian Desmond (with James Moore)

Guy Deutscher

Keith Devlin

Lee De-Wit

Iain Dey (with Douglas Buck)

Persi Diaconis (with Ron Graham)

Persi Diaconis (with Brian Skyrms)

Philip K. Dick

Andrew Dilnot (with Michael Blastland)

Douglas Dixon (with John Adams)

Cory Doctorow

Pieter van Dokkum

Paul Dolan

Pedro Domingos

Michael Dowd

Neil Downie

Douwe Draaisma

Liam Drew

Karl Drinkwater

Sarah Dry

Marcus du Sautoy

Stephen Dubner (with Steven Levitt)

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