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James Tagg

Nassim Nicholas Taleb

Don Tapscott (with Anthony Williams)

Daniel Tammet

Elizabeth Tasker

Jürgen Taut

Fred Taylor

Jeremy Taylor

Jodi Taylor

Kathleen Taylor

Marianne Taylor

Steve Taylor

Max Tegmark

Nicola Temple (with Catherine Whitlock)

Dick Teresi (with Leon Lederman)

Andrew Thomas

Ken Thompson

Mark Thompson

Rebecca Thompson

Steven Tijms

James Tiptree Junior (Alice Sheldon)

Lluis Torner (with Marta Garcia-Matos)

Terry Treadwell

Timothy Treadwell

Robert Trivers

Roberto Trotta

Dave Trumbore (with Donna Nelson)

Colin Tucker

S. D. Tucker

Chris Turney

Jon Turney

Neil Turok (with Paul Steinhardt)

Samuel Turvey

Neil de Grasse Tyson

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