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Michelle Baddeley

Paul Bader (with Adam Hart-Davis)

Jim Baggott

Gregory Baker

Joanne Baker

Hartosh Singh Bal (with Gaurav Suri)

Jonathan Balcombe

Sebastien Balibar

Brian Ball

Johnny Ball

Keith Ball

Philip Ball

Fernando Ballesteros (with Daniel Altschuler)

Iain Banks

David Barash

Tom Barnes et al.

Cynthia Barnett

Simon Baron-Cohen

John Barrow

Anthony Barnosky

Craig Bauer

Robert Bauval

Robert Bauval (with Thomas Brophy)

Stephen Baxter

Norman Beale

Elizabeth Bear

David Beerling

Randy Beikmann

Jim Bell

Alex Bellos (with Edmund Harriss)

Bruce Benamran

Arthur Benjamin

Arthur Benjamin (with Michael Shermer)

Jeffrey Bennett

Nigel Benson 

Nigel Benson (with Boris van Loon)

Peter Bentley

 Michael Benton

Mike Berners-Lee

Alain Berthoz

Michael Bess

Colin Beveridge

Pierre Binétruy

James  Binney

Piers Bizony

Sandra Blakeslee (with V. S. Ramachandran)

Michael Blastland

Michael Blastland (with Andrew Dilnot)

James Blish

Paul Bloom

Mark Blumberg

Katherine Blundell

Stephen Blundell

David Bodanis

Alex Boese

David Bohm

Martin Bojowald

B J Booth

Nicholas Booth (with Elizabeth Howell)

Nick Bostrom

Peter Bowler

Stephen Bown

David Bradley

Mark Brake (with Neil Hook)

Uri Bram

Loretta Graziano Breuning

Dennis Brian

Jean Bricmont

Henry Brighton (with Howard Selina)

William Brock

Jed Brody

Wally Broecker (with Charles Langmuir)

Clive Bromhall

  • The Eternal Child: how evolution has made children of us all *****
  • Keith Brooke (Ed.)

    Michael Brooks

    Michael Brooks (with Rick Edwards)

    Thomas Brophy (with Robert Bauval)

    Michael Brotherton (ed.)

    Andrew Brown

    Brandon Brown

    Guy Brown

    JPat Brown et al

    Matt Brown

    Paul Brown

    Richard Brown

    Janet Browne

    John Browne

    Leslie Brunetta (with Catherine Craig)

    John Brunner

    Kimberley Bruno (with Christopher Gerry)

    Bill Bryson

    Tanya Bub and Jeffrey Bub

    Allen Buchanan

    Mark Buchanan

    Jed Buchwald (with Diane Greco Josefowicz)

    Douglas Buck (with Iain Dey)

    Bernard Bulkin

    Dean Buonomano

    Druin Burch

    Edward Burger (with Michael Starbird)

    Robbins Burling

    Dean Burnett

    Mathieu Burniat (with Thibault Damour)

    William Byers

    William Bynum

    William Bynum (with Roy Porter)

    Peter Byrne 

    Thomas Byrne (with Tom Cassidy)

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