Skip to main content

Authors - B

A-B-C-D-E-F-G-H-I-J-K-L-M-N-O-P-Q-R-S-T-U-V-W-X-Y-Z


Michelle Baddeley

Paul Bader (with Adam Hart-Davis)

Jim Baggott

Gregory Baker

Joanne Baker

Hartosh Singh Bal (with Gaurav Suri)

Jonathan Balcombe

Sebastien Balibar

Brian Ball

Johnny Ball

Keith Ball

Philip Ball

Fernando Ballesteros (with Daniel Altschuler)

Iain Banks

David Barash

Tom Barnes et al.

Cynthia Barnett

Simon Baron-Cohen

John Barrow

Anthony Barnosky

Craig Bauer

Robert Bauval

Robert Bauval (with Thomas Brophy)

Stephen Baxter

Norman Beale

Elizabeth Bear

David Beerling

Randy Beikmann

Jim Bell

Alex Bellos (with Edmund Harriss)

Bruce Benamran

Arthur Benjamin

Arthur Benjamin (with Michael Shermer)

Jeffrey Bennett

Nigel Benson 

Nigel Benson (with Boris van Loon)

Peter Bentley

 Michael Benton

Mike Berners-Lee

Alain Berthoz

Michael Bess

Colin Beveridge

Pierre Binétruy

James  Binney

Piers Bizony

Sandra Blakeslee (with V. S. Ramachandran)

Michael Blastland

Michael Blastland (with Andrew Dilnot)

James Blish

Paul Bloom

Mark Blumberg

Katherine Blundell

Stephen Blundell

David Bodanis

Alex Boese

David Bohm

Martin Bojowald

B J Booth

Nick Bostrom

Peter Bowler

Stephen Bown

David Bradley

Mark Brake (with Neil Hook)

Uri Bram

Loretta Graziano Breuning

Dennis Brian

Jean Bricmont

Henry Brighton (with Howard Selina)

William Brock

Wally Broecker (with Charles Langmuir)

Clive Bromhall

Michael Brooks

Michael Brooks (with Rick Edwards)

Thomas Brophy (with Robert Bauval)

Michael Brotherton (ed.)

Andrew Brown

Brandon Brown

Guy Brown

JPat Brown et al

Matt Brown

Paul Brown

Richard Brown

Janet Browne

John Browne

Leslie Brunetta (with Catherine Craig)

John Brunner

Kimberley Bruno (with Christopher Gerry)

Bill Bryson

Tanya Bub and Jeffrey Bub

Allen Buchanan

Mark Buchanan

Jed Buchwald (with Diane Greco Josefowicz)

Douglas Buck (with Iain Dey)

Bernard Bulkin

Dean Buonomano

Druin Burch

Edward Burger (with Michael Starbird)

Robbins Burling

Dean Burnett

Mathieu Burniat (with Thibault Damour)

William Byers

William Bynum

William Bynum (with Roy Porter)

Peter Byrne 

Thomas Byrne (with Tom Cassidy)

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Tim Woollings - Four Way Interview

Tim Woollings is an Associate Professor in Physical Climate Science at the University of Oxford, leading a team of researchers in the Atmospheric Dynamics group. He obtained his PhD in Meteorology in 2005 and since then has worked on a variety of topics spanning weather prediction, atmospheric dynamics and circulation, and the effects of climate change. He has studied how the jet stream varies over weeks, years, and decades, and how we can better predict these changes. He was a contributing author on three chapters of the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report. Tim worked at the University of Reading as a postdoc, research fellow and then lecturer before moving to the University of Oxford in 2013. He is now the Oxford Joint Chair of the Met Office Academic Partnership. His new book is Jet Stream.

Why climate?

It has never been more important to learn about how our climate system works, and how we are affecting it. You certainly get a lot of satisfaction when your work touches on hugely important …

The Apollo Chronicles - Brandon Brown *****

There were two reasons I wasn't expecting much from this book. Firstly, there have been so many titles on the Apollo programme and the space race. And secondly, a book that focusses on the engineering involved would surely be far too much at the nut and bolt level (literally), missing out on the overarching drama that makes the story live. Also there were so many people involved - 400,000 is mentioned - that we couldn't have much human interest because we would be bombarded with lists of names.

Instead, I was charmed by Brandon Brown's account. His father was one of the engineers, but he isn't given undue prominence - Brown picks out a handful of characters and follows them through, bringing in others as necessary, but never overwhelming us with names. And while it's true that there is a lot of nitty gritty engineering detail, it rarely becomes dull. Somehow, Brown pulls off the feat of making the day-to-day, hectic engineering work engaging.

I think in part this …

Saturn – William Sheehan ****

This book marks something of a milestone in my reviewing career: it’s the first time I’ve seen an excerpt from one of my reviews printed on the back cover. It comes from my review of Sheehan’s previous book, on Mercury, which I said ‘easily convinced me the Solar System’s 'least interesting' planet is still a pretty fascinating place.’ That wasn’t an easy task for the author, given Mercury’s unspectacular appearance and reputation – but Saturn is a different matter. With its iconic rings, easily visible through a small telescope, it’s the favourite planet of many amateur astronomers. For space scientists, too, it’s a prime target – given that two of its moons, Titan and Enceladus, look like the kind of places we might find alien life. So Sheehan’s challenge this time wasn’t to find enough material to fill 200 pages, but to distil a potentially huge subject down to that size.

He meets this challenge just as successfully as the previous one – but not quite in the way I was expect…