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Michelle Baddeley

Paul Bader (with Adam Hart-Davis)

Jim Baggott

David Bainbridge

Gregory Baker

Joanne Baker

Hartosh Singh Bal (with Gaurav Suri)

Jonathan Balcombe

Sebastien Balibar

Brian Ball

James Ball

  • The System: who owns the internet, and how it owns us ****
  • Johnny Ball

    Keith Ball

    Philip Ball

    Fernando Ballesteros (with Daniel Altschuler)

    Iain Banks

    David Barash

    Tom Barnes et al.

    Cynthia Barnett

    John Barnett

    Simon Baron-Cohen

    John Barrow

    Anthony Barnosky

    Craig Bauer

    Robert Bauval

    Robert Bauval (with Thomas Brophy)

    Stephen Baxter

    Norman Beale

    Elizabeth Bear

    Milo Beckman

    Alain Bécoulet

    David Beerling

    Randy Beikmann

    Jim Bell

    Alex Bellos (with Edmund Harriss)

    Bruce Benamran

    Arthur Benjamin

    Arthur Benjamin (with Michael Shermer)

    Jeffrey Bennett

    Nigel Benson 

    Nigel Benson (with Boris van Loon)

    Peter Bentley

     Michael Benton

    J. D. Beresford

    Mike Berners-Lee

    Jeremy Bernstein

  • A Song for Molly ***
  • Alain Berthoz

    Michael Bess

    Colin Beveridge

    Pierre Binétruy

    James  Binney

    Piers Bizony

    Sandra Blakeslee (with V. S. Ramachandran)

    Michael Blastland

    Michael Blastland (with Andrew Dilnot)

    James Blish

    Paul Bloom

    Mark Blumberg

    Katherine Blundell

    Stephen Blundell

    Cain Blythe (with Paul Jepson)

    David Bodanis

    Alex Boese

    David Bohm

    Martin Bojowald

    Jean-François Bonnefon

    B J Booth

    Nicholas Booth (with Elizabeth Howell)

    Nick Bostrom

    Peter Bowler

    Stephen Bown

  • The Age of Scurvy ****
  • Paul Braddon

    David Bradley

    Mark Brake (with Neil Hook)

    Uri Bram

    Loretta Graziano Breuning

    Dennis Brian

    Jean Bricmont

    S L Bridle

    Henry Brighton (with Howard Selina)

    William Brock

    Jed Brody

    Wally Broecker (with Charles Langmuir)

    Clive Bromhall

  • The Eternal Child: how evolution has made children of us all *****
  • Keith Brooke (Ed.)

    Michael Brooks

    Michael Brooks (with Rick Edwards)

    Thomas Brophy (with Robert Bauval)

    Michael Brotherton (ed.)

    Andrew Brown

    Brandon Brown

    Guy Brown

    JPat Brown et al

    Matt Brown

    Paul Brown

    Richard Brown

    Janet Browne

    John Browne

    Leslie Brunetta (with Catherine Craig)

    John Brunner

    Kimberley Bruno (with Christopher Gerry)

    Bill Bryson

    Tanya Bub and Jeffrey Bub

    Allen Buchanan

    Mark Buchanan

    Jed Buchwald (with Diane Greco Josefowicz)

    Douglas Buck (with Iain Dey)

    Stephen Budiansky

    Algis Budrys

    Bernard Bulkin

    Dean Buonomano

    Druin Burch

    Edward Burger (with Michael Starbird)

    Colin Burgess

    Robbins Burling

    Dean Burnett

    Mathieu Burniat (with Thibault Damour)

    William Byers

    William Bynum

    William Bynum (with Roy Porter)

    Peter Byrne 

    Thomas Byrne (with Tom Cassidy)

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