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Dana Mackenzie

Jimmy Maher

Theodore Maiman

Ronald Mallett (with Bruce Henderson)

Marjorie Malley

Simon Malpas (with Deborah Scott) Eds.

Bill Manhire (with Paul Callaghan)

Eli Maor (with Eugene Jost)

Jo Marchant

Simone Marchi

Chiara Marletto

J P Marques de Sa

Jason Marsh (with Jeremy Adam and Dacher Keltner)

Alan Marshall

Andy Martin

George R. R. Martin

Paul Martin

Steve Martin (with Robert Cialdini & Noah Goldstein)

John Martineau

Mark Mason

Ehsan Masood

Robert Matthews

Andrew May

Andrew Mayne

Brian May (with Chris Lintott, Patrick Moore)

Joseph Mazur

Paul McAuley

Kevin McCain (with Kostas Kampourakis)


Patrick McCray

Ian McDonald

J. P. McEvoy (with Oscar Zarate)

Johnjoe McFadden (with Jim Al-Khalili)

Johnjoe McFadden (with Jim Al-Khalili)

Ben McFarland

Sharon Bertsch Mcgrayne

Lee Mcintyre

Steven McKevitt (with Tony Ryan)

Allan McRobie

Allan McRobie

Nicholas Mee

Andrew Meharg

David Mermin

Rebecca Mileham

Arthur Miller

Ben Miller

Jonathan Miller (with Borin van Loon)

Louise Miller

Gemma Milne

Mark Miodownik

Melanie Mitchell

Steven Mitten

Leonard Mlodinow

Leonard Mlodinow (with Stephen Hawking)

John Moffat

Jamie Mollart

  • Kings of a Dead World (SF) ****
  • Bennie Mols (with Nieske Vergunst)

    Nicholas Money

    James Moore (with Adrian Desmond)

    Patrick Moore

    Patrick Moore (with Brian May, Chris Lintott)

    Pete Moore

    Wendy Moore

    Michael Morange

    S. J. Morden

    Richard Morgan

    Andrew Morris

    Charles Morris

    Errol Morris

    Oliver Morton

    Iwan Rhys Morus

    Steve Mould (with Helen Arney)

    Siddhartha Mukherjee

    Hazel Muir

    James Muirden

    Sendhil Mullainathan (with Eldar Shafir)

    Richard Muller

    Randall Munroe

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