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Brian Fagan

Frank Fahy

Ben Falk

Patricia Fara

Graham Farmelo

Steven Farmer

Erol Faruk

Kitty Ferguson

Oscar Fernandez

Pedro Ferreira

Georgina Ferry

Richard Feynman

Michelle Feynman (ed.)

Cordelia Fine

Ann Finkbeiner

Ed Finn

Clive Finlayson

Stuart Firestein

Baruch Fischhoff (with John Kadvany)

Len Fisher

Tim Flannery

Simon Flynn

Joshua Foer

Peter Forbes

Peter Forbes (with Tom Grimsey)

Brian Ford

Martin Ford

Jeff Forshaw (with Brian Cox)

Richard Fortey

Lance Fortnow

Adam Frank

Lone Frank

Daniel Franklin

Mark Frary

Giovanni Frazzetto

Matthew Frederick (with John Kuprenas)

John Freely

Art Friedman (with Leonard Susskind)

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