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James O'Brien

Daniel Oberhaus

  • Extraterrestrial Languages ***
  • Ogi Ogas (with Todd Rose)

    Mick O'Hare

    Hans Ohanian

    Veronica O'Keane

    Arlindo Oliveira

    Randy Olson

    Cathy O'Neil

  • Weapons of Math Destruction: how big data increases inequality and threatens democracy ****
  • Luke O'Neil

  • Never Mind the B#ll*cks, here's the Science: a scientist's guide to the biggest challenges facing our species today ***
  • Stephen James O'Meara

    Naomi Oreskes

  • Why Trust Science? ***
  • Jane O'Reilly

    David Orr (Ed.)

  • Democracy in a Hotter Time ***
  • David Orrell

    Chad Orzel

    David M. Oshinsky

    Julius Mario Ottino (with Bruce Mau)

    Shawn Otto

    Jennifer Ouellette

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