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Authors - W

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Frans de Waal

Peter Wadhams

John Waller

Ian Walmsley

Benjamin Wardhaugh

A. E. Warren

Ian Watson

James Watson

Nigel Watson

Stephen Webb

Gavin Weightman

Steven Weinberg

David Weintraub

Andy Weir

Michael Welland

Wellcome (Mosaic Science)

H. G. Wells

  • The World Set Free (SF) ***
  • World Brain (SF)  ***
  • Gary Wenk

    John Wenz

    Brad Wetzler

    David Whitehouse

    Catherine Whitlock (with Nicola Temple)

    Tom Whyntie (with Oliver Pugh)

    Norbert Wiener

    Marjorie Wieseman

    Frank Wilczek

    Stephen Wilk

    Maurice Wilkins

    Matt Wilkinson

    Yorick Wilks

  • Artificial Intelligence: modern magic or dangerous future? ****
  • Clifford Will (with Nicolas Yunes)

    Anthony Williams (with Don Tapscott)

    J. B. Williams

    Mark Williams (with Jan Zalasiewicz)

    Paul Williams

    Sheila Williams

    Victoria Williamson

    Jon Willis

    Christopher Wills

    Edward Wilson

    Edward Wilson (with Bert Holldobler)

    Robin Wilson

    Ian Wilmut (with Roger Highfield)

    Davey Winder

    Nick Clark Windo

    Laurie Winkless

    Emily Winterburn

    Richard Wiseman

    Peter Woit

    Maryanne Wolf

    Gene Wolfe

    Stephen Wolfram

  • Adventures of a Computational Explorer ***
  • Robert Wolke

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