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Authors - P

A-B-C-D-E-F-G-H-I-J-K-L-M-N-O-P-Q-R-S-T-U-V-W-X-Y-Z


Antonio Padilla

Ra Page

Stephanie Pain

Abraham Pais

Mark Pallen

Douglas Palmer

Stephen Palmer

Tim Palmer

Alexei Panshin

Richard Panek

Giorgio Parisi

Jason Parisi (with Justin Ball)

Michael Alan Park

Andew Parker

Matt Parker

John Parrington

Paul Parsons

Heinrich Pässe

William Patrick (with John Cacioppo)

Gregory S. Paul

Sophie Pavelle

Tony Peake

Fred Pearce

Iain Pears

George Pendle

Robert Penn

Eliot Peper

Delia Perlov (with Alex Vilenkin)

John Perry (with Jack Challoner)

Peter Pesic

Jonas Peters (with Nicolai Meinhausen)

Sam Peters

Carolyn Collins Petersen

Andrew Petto (with Laurie Godfrey)

Patricia Pierce

Alexis Mari Pietak

Orrin Pilkey (with Rob Young)

Stephen Pincock

Adolfo Plasencia

Robert Plomin

Frederik Pohl

Frederik Pohl (with Cyril Kornbluth)

John Polkinghorne

Henry Pollack

Michael Pollan

Justin Pollard

Andrew Pontoon

Roy Porter (with William Bynum)

Stefanie Posavec (with Miriam Quick)

William Poundstone

Emmanuelle Pouydebat (trans. Erik Butler)

Richard Powers

Thomas Povey

Terry Pratchett

Terry Pratchett (with Ian Stewart and Jack Cohen)

Tim Pratt

Diana Preston

Louisa Preston

Frans Pretorius (with Steven Gubser)

Christopher Priest

John Prior

Joel Primack (with Nancy Ellen Abrams)

Lawrence Principe

David Prothero

Donald Prothero

Oliver Pugh (with Brian Clegg)

Oliver Pugh (with Tom Whyntie)

Robert Michael Pyle

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