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Authors - H

A-B-C-D-E-F-G-H-I-J-K-L-M-N-O-P-Q-R-S-T-U-V-W-X-Y-Z

Jonathan Haidt

Mike Hally

Paul Halpern

Richard Hamblyn

Øyvind Hammer

David Hand

Stephen Handelman (with Ken Alibek)

Michael Hanlon

James Hannam

Robin Hanson

Thor Hanson

Tim Harford

Tony Hargreaves

John Harrison

Timandra Harkness

Kathryn Harkup

Sarah Harper

Rom Harré

Brian Hayes

Judith Rich Harris

Edmund Harriss (with Alex Bellos)

John Harrison

Adam Hart-Davis

Adam Hart-Davis (with Paul Bader)

Matthew Hartings

Thomas Häusler

Mark Haw

Paul Hawken (Ed.)

Stephen Hawking

Stephen Hawking (with Leonard Mlodinow)

Robert Hazen

Luke Heaton

Sandra Hempel

Jeff Hecht

Robert Heinlein

  • The Moon is a Harsh Mistress (SF) ****
  • Nigel Henbest (with Heather Couper)

    Bruce Henderson (with Ronald Mallett)

    Mark Henderson

    Frank Herbert

    César Hidalgo

    Fukagawa Hidetoshi (with Tony Rothman)

    Gordon Higgins

    Peter Higgins

    Roger Highfield (with Martin Nowak)

    Roger Highfield (with Ian Wilmut)

    Christopher Hill (with Leon Lederman)

    Kim Hill (with Paul Callaghan)

    Tom Hird

    Margaret Hilton (with Nancy Cooke) Eds.

    Alan Hirshfeld

    Donald Hoffman

    Eva Hoffman

    Dan Hofstadter

    Lancelot Hogben

    Bert Holldobler (with E. O. Wilson)

    David Hone

    Richard Hollingham (with Sue Nelson)

    Adrian Hon

    Mark Honigsbaum

    Neil Hook (with Mark Brake)

    Terry Hope

    Jim Horne

    Michael Hoskin

    Sabine Hossenfelder

    Jules Howard

    Elizabeth Howell (with Nicholas Booth)

    Michael Hunter

    James Hurford

    Dan Hurley

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