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Authors - H

A-B-C-D-E-F-G-H-I-J-K-L-M-N-O-P-Q-R-S-T-U-V-W-X-Y-Z

Jonathan Haidt

Mike Hally

Paul Halpern

Richard Hamblyn

Øyvind Hammer

David Hand

Stephen Handelman (with Ken Alibek)

Michael Hanlon

James Hannam

Robin Hanson

Thor Hanson

Tony Hargreaves

John Harrison

Timandra Harkness

Kathryn Harkup

Sarah Harper

Rom Harré

Brian Hayes

Judith Rich Harris

Edmund Harriss (with Alex Bellos)

John Harrison

Adam Hart-Davis

Adam Hart-Davis (with Paul Bader)

Matthew Hartings

Thomas Häusler

Mark Haw

Paul Hawken (Ed.)

Stephen Hawking

Stephen Hawking (with Leonard Mlodinow)

Robert Hazen

Luke Heaton

Sandra Hempel

Jeff Hecht

Nigel Henbest (with Heather Couper)

Bruce Henderson (with Ronald Mallett)

Mark Henderson

Frank Herbert

César Hidalgo

Fukagawa Hidetoshi (with Tony Rothman)

Gordon Higgins

Peter Higgins

Roger Highfield (with Martin Nowak)

Roger Highfield (with Ian Wilmut)

Christopher Hill (with Leon Lederman)

Kim Hill (with Paul Callaghan)

Tom Hird

Margaret Hilton (with Nancy Cooke) Eds.

Alan Hirshfeld

Eva Hoffman

Dan Hofstadter

Lancelot Hogben

Bert Holldobler (with E. O. Wilson)

David Hone

Richard Hollingham (with Sue Nelson)

Mark Honigsbaum

Neil Hook (with Mark Brake)

Terry Hope

Jim Horne

Michael Hoskin

Sabine Hossenfelder

Jules Howard

Michael Hunter

James Hurford

Dan Hurley

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