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Colin Stuart - Four Way Interview

Colin Stuart is an astronomy journalist, author and science communicator. He has written fourteen science books to date, which have been translated into nineteen languages, including 13 Journeys Through Space and Time: Christmas Lectures From the Royal Institution and The Universe in Bite-sized Chunks both published by Michael O’Mara Books. He also has written for the Guardian, the European Space Agency and New Scientist and has spoken on Sky News, BBC News and Radio 5 Live. He is a fellow of the Royal Astronomical Society and even has an asteroid named after him. His latest title is Rebel Star: our quest to solve the great mysteries of the Sun.

Why science? 

For me the stories that you can tell with modern science rival the most imaginative leaps in fiction. The secret, invisible kingdoms of bacteria and sub-atomic particles. The logic defying realms of black holes and Big Bangs. That excites me more than Hogwarts or Mordor. The universe is an amazing place and we’ve only just scratched the surface. Barely a week goes by now without some astounding revelation about the nature of our reality. It’s a great time to be writing about science, astronomy in particular.

Why this book?

We are entering a game-changing era of solar physics. For millennia we built temples to the Sun and they eventually gave way to telescopes to gaze at our nearest star from afar. But now - thanks to the Parker Solar Probe - we are flying inside the Sun’s atmosphere.  Getting up close and personal will hopefully unlock its deepest secrets, solving centuries old mysteries and helping protect us from the worst the Sun has to throw at us.

What’s next?

I’m about to embark on a book tour, taking the Sun and its secrets into schools and public events. I’m also developing a training workshop for schools and businessss based on the way astronauts think. 

What’s exciting you at the moment?

The search for Planet Nine - a rumoured undiscovered world in our own solar system beyond the orbit of Neptune. I love the fact that we’ve found thousands of planets circling other stars, but the list of our own planets may be incomplete.

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