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Royal Society Insight Investment Science Book Prize 2017

The winner of the Royal Society Insight Investment Science book prize 2017 has been announced:

Congratulations to Cordelia Fine for her success with Testosterone Rex.

The shortlist was:
Congratulations to all those on the shortlist. As always we've a list of other superb science books that should have been on the list too to round out our own longlist:



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