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Royal Society Science Books Prize 2016

The winner of for Royal Society Insight Investment Science Book Prize has now been announced: 

WINNER

  • The Invention of Nature - Alexander von Humboldt's New World - Andrea Wolf

SHORTLIST
  • Cure - A journey into the science of mind over body - Jo Marchant
  • The Gene - an intimate history - Siddhartha Mukherjee
  • The Hunt for Vulcan - and how Albert Einstein Destroyed a Planet, Discovered Relativity and Deciphered the Universe - Thomas Levenson
  • The Most Perfect Thing - Inside (and Outside) a Bird's Egg - Tim Birkhead
  • The Planet Remade - The Challenge of Imagining Deliberate Climate Change - Oliver Morton


Once again they panel proved incapable of producing a longlist.

The judging panel for 2016 was: chaired by bestselling author Bill Bryson, who won the Prize in 2004 with A Short History of Nearly Everything, and joined by four other judges this year: theoretical physicist Dr Clare Burrage, celebrated science fiction author Alastair Reynolds, ornithologist and science blogger GrrlScientist, and Roger Highfield, Director of External Affairs at The Science Museum.

More details from the Royal Society website.

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