Skip to main content

Authors - C

A-B-C-D-E-F-G-H-I-J-K-L-M-N-O-P-Q-R-S-T-U-V-W-X-Y-Z

Tom Cabot

John Cacioppo (with William Patrick)

Deborah Cadbury

Alice Calaprice

Nigel Calder

Nigel Calder (with Henrik Svensmark)

Paul Callaghan (with Kim Hill)

Paul Callaghan (with Bill Manhire)

Craig Callender (with Ralph Edney)

Deborah Cameron

Fritjof Capra

Nessa Carey

Robert Cargill

Bernard Carlson 

Brian Carpenter

Michael Carroll

Sean Carroll

Richard Carter

Rita Carter

Stephen Cass (with Kevin Grazier)

Tom Cassidy (with Thomas Byrne)

Brian Cathcart

Jack Challoner

Jack Challoner (with John Perry)

Nicholas Cheetham

Margaret Cheney

Eugenia Cheng

Marcus Chown

Marcus Chown (with Govert Schilling)

Brian Christian

Brian Christian (with Tom Griffiths)

Robert Cialdini (with Noah Goldstein & Steve Martin)

Milan Circovic

John Clancy

Stuart Clark

David Clarke

Brian Clegg 

Brian Clegg (with Oliver Pugh)

Brian Clegg (with Rhodri Evans)

Raymond Clemens (ed.)

Daniel Clery

Frank Close

I. B. Cohen

Jack Cohen (with Ian Stewart and Terry Pratchett)

Richard Cohen

Peter Coles

Harry Collins

Robert Colvile

Neil Comins

Joseph Conlon

Mariana Cook

Peter Cook

Mike Cook (with Tony Veale)

Nancy Cooke (with Margaret Hilton) Eds.

Ashley Cooper

Geoffrey Cooper

Henry Cooper

Jennifer Coopersmith

Jack Copeland

David Corcoran (Ed.)

Charles Cotton (with Kate Kirk)

Heather Couper (with Nigel Henbest)

Brian Cox (with Jeff Forshaw)

Daniel Coyle

Jerry Coyne

Naomi Craft

Catherine Craig (with Leslie Brunetta)

Robert Crease

Robert Crease (with Alfred Scarf Goldhaber)

Ian Crofton

Alfred Crosby

John Croucher (with Rosalind Croucher)

Rosalind Croucher (with John Croucher)

Vilmos Csányi

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

The Science of Being Human - Marty Jopson *****

It might seem at first sight that a book titled 'The Science of Being Human' is about biology (or anthropology) - and certainly there's an element of that in Marty Jopson's entertaining collection of pretty-well freestanding articles on human science - but in reality a better clue comes from the subtitle 'why we behave, think and feel the way we do.'

What Jopson does is to pick out different aspects of the human experience - often quite small and very specific things - and take us through the science behind it. I often found that it was something I really wasn't expecting that really caught my fancy. The test with this kind of book is often what inspires the reader to tell someone else about it - the first thing I found myself telling the world was about why old 3D films used to give you a headache, but modern ones tend not to. (It's about the way that in the real world, your eyes swivel towards each other as things get closer to you.)

It's irresisti…

The Crowd and the Cosmos - Chris Lintott ****

We tend to have a very old fashioned idea of what astronomers do - peering through telescopes on dark nights. In reality, not only do many of them not use optical telescopes, but almost all observations are now performed electronically. Chris Lintott does a great job of bringing alive the realities of modern astronomy, and the way that the flood of data that is produced by all these electronic devices is being in part addressed by 'citizen scientists' - volunteer individuals who check image after image for interesting features.

Inevitably, all this cataloguing and categorising brings to mind Ernest Rutherford's infamous quotation along the lines of 'all science is either physics or stamp collecting.' This occurred to me even before Chris Lintott brought it up. Lintott defends the process against the Rutherford attack by pointing out that it can be a useful starting point for real, new research. To be fair to Rutherford, I think this misses the great man's poin…

Artificial Intelligence - Melanie Mitchell *****

As Melanie Mitchell makes plain, humans have limitations in their visual abilities, typified by optical illusions, but artificial intelligence (AI) struggles at a much deeper level with recognising what's going on in images. Similarly in some ways, the visual appearance of this book misleads. It's worryingly fat and bears the ascetic light blue cover of the Pelican series, which since my childhood have been markers of books that were worthy but have rarely been readable. This, however, is an excellent book, giving a clear picture of how many AI systems go about their business and the huge problems designers of such systems face.

Not only does Mitchell explain the main approaches clearly, her account is readable and engaging. I read a lot of popular science books, and it's rare that I keep wanting to go back to one when I'm not scheduled to be reading it - this is one of those rare examples.

We discover how AI researchers have achieved the apparently remarkable abiliti…