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Authors - S

A-B-C-D-E-F-G-H-I-J-K-L-M-N-O-P-Q-R-S-T-U-V-W-X-Y-Z

Oliver Sacks

Carl Sagan

Nick Sagan

Angela Saini

Colin Salter

Ian Sample

Nina Samuels

Lisa Sanders

Arturo Sangalli

Aaron Santos

Robert Sapolsky

Helmut Satz

Eric Scerri

Caleb Scharf

Edward Scheinermann

Govert Schilling

Govert Schilling (with Marcus Chown)

Dirk Schulze-Makuch (with David Darling)

Bruce Schumm

Mosaic Science (Wellcome)

David Scott

Gino Segre

Charles Seife

Marc Seifer

Michael Sells

Howard Selina (with Henry Brighton)

Howard Selina (with Dylan Evans)

Anil Seth

Edar Shafir (with Sendhil Mullainathan)

Mike Shanahan

Karen Shanor (with Jagmeet Kanwal)

Dennis Shasha (with Cathy Lazere)

Rupert Sheldrake

Mary Shelley

David Shenk

Michael Shermer

Michael Shermer (with Arthur Benjamin)

Margot Lee Shetterly

Neil Shubin

Seth Shulman

Joel Shurkin

Nate Silver

Simon Singh

Simon Singh (with Edzard Ernst)

Fredrik Sjöberg

Keith Skene

Brian Skyrms (with Persi Diaconis)

Andrew Smart

Chris Smith

Gavin Smith

Leonard Smith

P. D. Smith

Lee Smolin

Alan Sokal

Robert Solomon

Jimmy Soni (with Rob Goodman)

Giles Sparrow

Vassilios McInnes Spathopoulos

Francis Spufford

Ashwin Srinivasan

Clifford Spiro

Curt Stager

Russell Stannard

Douglas Star

Michael Starbird (with Edward Burger)

Natalie Starkey

Robert Stayton

Andrew Steane

Michael Stebbins

James Stein

Paul Steinhardt (with Neil Turok)

Neal Stephenson

Iain Stewart

Ian Stewart

Ian Stewart (with Terry Pratchett and Jack Cohen)

Jeff Stewart

David Stipp

Douglas Stone

James Stone

Mary Stopes-Roe

David Stork

Carole Stott (with Robin Kerrod) 

Paul Strathearn

Linda Stratmann

Michael Strauss (with Neil de Grasse Tyson and Richard Gott)

Steven Strogatz

Rick Stroud

Students of the Camden School for Girls

Colin Stuart

Colin Stuart (with Mun Keat Looi)

Daniel Styler

Robert Sullivan

David Sumpter

Gaurav Suri (with Hartosh Singh Bal)

Leonard Susskind (with Art Friedman)

Richard and Daniel Susskind

Henrik Svensmark (with Nigel Calder)

Brian Switek

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