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Authors - M

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Dana Mackenzie

Ronald Mallett (with Bruce Henderson)

Marjorie Malley

Bill Manhire (with Paul Callaghan)

Eli Maor (with Eugene Jost)

Jo Marchant

J P Marques de Sa

Jason Marsh (with Jeremy Adam and Dacher Keltner)

Alan Marshall

Andy Martin

Paul Martin

Steve Martin (with Robert Cialdini & Noah Goldstein)

John Martineau

Mark Mason

Ehsan Masood

Robert Matthews

Andrew May

Brian May (with Chris Lintott, Patrick Moore)

Joseph Mazur

Patrick McCray

J. P. McEvoy (with Oscar Zarate)

Johnjoe McFadden (with Jim Al-Khalili)

Ben McFarland

Sharon Bertsch Mcgrayne

Sharon Bertsch McGuire

Steven McKevitt (with Tony Ryan)

Andrew Meharg

David Mermin

Rebecca Mileham

Arthur Miller

Ben Miller

Jonathan Miller (with Borin van Loon)

Mark Miodownik

Melanie Mitchell

Steven Mitten

Leonard Mlodinow

Leonard Mlodinow (with Stephen Hawking)

John Moffat

Nicholas Money

James Moore (with Adrian Desmond)

Patrick Moore

Patrick Moore (with Brian May, Chris Lintott)

Pete Moore

Wendy Moore

Michael Morange

Andrew Morris

Charles Morris

Oliver Morton

Siddhartha Mukherjee

Hazel Muir

James Muirden

Sendhil Mullainathan (with Eldar Shafir)

Richard Muller

Randall Munroe

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