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Authors - G

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Pauline Gagnon

Chris Gainor

Clive Gamble (with John Gowlett and Robin Dunbar)

Lynn Gamwell

Shan Gao

Marta Garcia-Matos (with Lluis Torner)

Dan Gardner

Martin Gardner

Evalyn Gates

Adam Gazzaley (with Larry Rosen)

James Geach

Henry Gee

Rose George

Sean Gerrish

Christopher Gerry (with Kimberley Bruno)

Masha Gessen

Susannah Gibson

Gerd Gigerenzer

George Gilder

Colin Gillespie

James Gillies

Malcolm Gladwell

James Gleick

Ian Glynn

Laurie Godfrey (with Andrew Petto)

Ben Goldacre

Billy Goldberg (with Mark Leyner)

Alfred Scarf Goldhaber (with Robert Crease)

Noah Goldstein (with Steve Martin & Robert Cialdini)

Mike Goldsmith

Lawrence & Nancy Goldstone

Jeff Gomez

Laurence Gonzales

Jane Goodall

  • Hope for Animals and their World ****
  • Michael Gordin

    Alan Goriely

    Elisabeth Gordon (with Laurent Keller)

    Richard Gott (with Michael Strauss and Neil de Grasse Tyson)

    Richard Gott

    John Gowlett (with Clive Gamble and Robin Dunbar)

    Francis Graham-Smith

    Ron Graham (with Persi Diaconis)

    John Grant

    Jeremy Gray

    Theodore Gray

    Kevin Grazier (with Stephen Cass)

    Brian Greene

    Pietro Greco

    Peter Grego

    Andrew Gregory

    Bruce Gregory

    Jane Gregory

    Richard Gregory

    John Gribbin

    John Gribbin (with Mary Gribbin)

    Tom Griffiths (with Brian Christian)

    Tom Grimsey (with Peter Forbes)

    Frederick Grinnell

    Simon Guerrier (with Marek Kukula)

    Göran Grimvall

    Steven Gubser (with Frans Pretorius)

    Lee Gutkind

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