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Authors - B

A-B-C-D-E-F-G-H-I-J-K-L-M-N-O-P-Q-R-S-T-U-V-W-X-Y-Z


Michelle Baddeley

Paul Bader (with Adam Hart-Davis)

Jim Baggott

Gregory Baker

Joanne Baker

Hartosh Singh Bal (with Gaurav Suri)

Jonathan Balcombe

Sebastien Balibar

Brian Ball

Johnny Ball

Keith Ball

Philip Ball

Fernando Ballesteros (with Daniel Altschuler)

Iain Banks

David Barash

Tom Barnes et al.

Cynthia Barnett

Simon Baron-Cohen

John Barrow

Anthony Barnosky

Craig Bauer

Robert Bauval

Robert Bauval (with Thomas Brophy)

Norman Beale

Elizabeth Bear

David Beerling

Randy Beikmann

Jim Bell

Alex Bellos (with Edmund Harriss)

Bruce Benamran

Arthur Benjamin

Arthur Benjamin (with Michael Shermer)

Jeffrey Bennett

Nigel Benson 

Nigel Benson (with Boris van Loon)

Peter Bentley

 Michael Benton

Mike Berners-Lee

Alain Berthoz

Michael Bess

Colin Beveridge

Pierre Binétruy

James  Binney

Piers Bizony

Sandra Blakeslee (with V. S. Ramachandran)

Michael Blastland

Michael Blastland (with Andrew Dilnot)

James Blish

Paul Bloom

Mark Blumberg

Katherine Blundell

Stephen Blundell

David Bodanis

Alex Boese

David Bohm

Martin Bojowald

B J Booth

Nick Bostrom

Peter Bowler

Stephen Bown

David Bradley

Mark Brake (with Neil Hook)

Uri Bram

Loretta Graziano Breuning

Dennis Brian

Jean Bricmont

Henry Brighton (with Howard Selina)

William Brock

Wally Broecker (with Charles Langmuir)

Clive Bromhall

Michael Brooks

Michael Brooks (with Rick Edwards)

Thomas Brophy (with Robert Bauval)

Michael Brotherton (ed.)

Andrew Brown

Brandon Brown

Guy Brown

JPat Brown et al

Matt Brown

Paul Brown

Richard Brown

Janet Browne

John Browne

Leslie Brunetta (with Catherine Craig)

John Brunner

Kimberley Bruno (with Christopher Gerry)

Bill Bryson

Tanya Bub and Jeffrey Bub

Allen Buchanan

Mark Buchanan

Jed Buchwald (with Diane Greco Josefowicz)

Douglas Buck (with Iain Dey)

Bernard Bulkin

Dean Buonomano

Druin Burch

Edward Burger (with Michael Starbird)

Robbins Burling

Dean Burnett

Mathieu Burniat (with Thibault Damour)

William Byers

William Bynum

William Bynum (with Roy Porter)

Peter Byrne 

Thomas Byrne (with Tom Cassidy)

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Where are the chemistry popular science books?

by Brian Clegg
There has never been more emphasis on the importance of public engagement. We need both to encourage a deeper interest in science and to counter anti-scientific views that seem to go hand-in-hand with some types of politics. Getting the public interested in science both helps recruit new scientists of the future and spreads an understanding of why an area of scientific research deserves funding. Yet it is possible that chemistry lags behind the other sciences in outreach. As a science writer, and editor of this website, I believe that chemistry is under-represented in popular science. I'd like to establish if this is the case, if so why it is happening - and what can be done to change things. 


An easy straw poll is provided by the topic tags on the site. At the time of writing, there are 22 books under 'chemistry' as opposed to 97 maths, 126 biology and 182 physics. The distribution is inevitably influenced by editorial bias - but as the editor, I can confirm …

The Universe Speaks in Numbers - Graham Farmelo ****

Theoretical physics has taken something of a hammering lately with books such as Sabine Hossenfelder's Lost in Math. The suggestion from these earlier titles is that theoretical physics is so obsessed with mathematics that many theoretical physicists spend their careers working on theory that doesn't actually apply to the universe, because the maths is interesting. Even experimental physics can be tainted, as the driver for new expenditure in experiments, such as the proposed new collider at CERN, is not driven by discoveries but by these mathematically-directed theories. Graham Farmelo presents the opposite view here: that this speculative mathematical work is, in fact, a great success.
As I am very much in the Hossenfelder camp, I expected to find Farmelo's book rather irritating, as it's effectively a love letter to mathematically-obsessed theoretical physics - but in reality (an entertaining phrase, given the context) I found it both interesting and enjoyable. Far…

The Perils of Perception - Bobby Duffy ****

How we see the world is not the way it really is. There have been several books based on this premise in the last few years, from Hans Rosling's impressive Factfulness to the distinctly fanciful The Case Against Reality by Donald Hoffman. In The Perils of Perception, Bobby Duffy takes an approach that is similar to Rosling's in surveying large numbers of people in different countries (in fact, one chapter of the book specifically references Rosling), but rather than concentrate as Rosling does on the specific topic of development, Duffy takes a much wider sweep of coverage of our perceptions of our world - and just like Rosling finds that most of us are way off on our appreciation of how things really are.
Whether we're dealing with politics and immigration, finance, climate change, sex or crime, Duffy shows that the majority of people tend to get things wrong. (I think I've read too many of these books, as I tended, if anything, to err in the opposite direction to the …