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A-B-C-D-E-F-G-H-I-J-K-L-M-N-O-P-Q-R-S-T-U-V-W-X-Y-Z

Marc Abrahams

Nancy Ellen Abrams (with Joel Primack)

David Acheson

Amir Aczel

Jeremy Adam (with Jason Marsh and Dacher Keltner)

John Adams (with Douglas Dixon)

Peter Adds et al

Charles Adler

John Agar

Nicholas Agar

Joseph d'Agnese (with Gordon Rugg)

Brad Aiken

Mary Aiken

Felix Alba-Juez

Hugh Aldersey-Williams

Amir Alexander

Ken Alibek (with Stephen Handelman)

Jim Al-Khalili

Jim Al-Khalili (with Johnjoe McFadden)

Wade Allison

Ali Almossawi

Ernesto Altshuler

Ben Ambridge

Kingsley Amis

Anil Ananthaswamy

Chris Anderson

Natalie Angier

Anil Ananthaswamy

Emily Anthes

Rob Appleby (with Ra Page) Editors

Dan Ariely

Robyn Arianrhod

Kyle Arnold

Helen Arney (with Steve Mould)

Kat Arney

Dominic Arsenault

Isaac Asimov

Frances Ashcroft

Peter Atkins

'Dr Austin'

Anthony Aveni

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